restoring trust

Instead of writing something for this blog today, I’ve contributed a fairly long post to a “symposium” on Rich Harwood’s website. My topic is why and how George Bush should begin to restore public trust. You are also invited to join the symposium by clicking the ad to the right.

As the Inauguration lays out a vision for the next 4 years, engage with Richard C. Harwood of The Harwood Institute and the leaders of Rock the Vote, Meetup.com, and other organizations that are on the forefront of change as they discuss the next chapter of America’s story. All this week on Redeeming Hope.

(The Harwood Institute is an important small institution that works with communties, newsrooms, organizations, and others to improve public life.)

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3 Responses to restoring trust

  1. Bean says:

    I read the posts at the Harwood site – and here, of course.

    The plain truth is that we can’t paper over what’s gone wrong. Make a red+blue list of what each side thinks has gone wrong and start with that. Just that list will show a certain amount of agreement between red and blue (I’m “blue” and live in a bright crimson “red” state and can vouch for this). There is more agreement about cultural dissonance than either side admits or would like to admit.

    However, the militancy of the far right can’t be dismissed and the left isn’t going to “get over it” any time soon — nor should we. Worse, big money is being made in all quarters (particularly on the right and in the media) from either/or thinking and militancy. An effort at healing which includes some painful recognition of who’s gaining from our differences may help.

    To be honest, I think we may be too far gone to redeem what we’ve lost. Barack Obama is lovely, but he’s a pol, already sounding paper-thin and slick. He’s not where the action is, but he’s a good paper-hanger!

  2. 2002…2003…2004…1984?: Democratic Education in a time of Doublespeak

    Steve Parks

    Eileen Schell,

    Syracuse University

    We are, admittedly, “reality” freaks.

    Of course, it is difficult to maintain a commitment to reality in the current national climate. Thanks to media outlets, such as Fox News, a large portion of t…

  3. 2002…2003…2004…1984?: Democratic Education in a time of Doublespeak

    Steve Parks

    Eileen Schell,

    Syracuse University

    We are, admittedly, “reality” freaks.

    Of course, it is difficult to maintain a commitment to reality in the current national climate. Thanks to media outlets, such as Fox News, a large portion of t…

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