Category Archives: moral network mapping

judgment in a world of power and institutions: outline of a view

Facebook8 Twitter3 Google+0Total: 11 Judgment or practical reason (i.e., deciding what is right to do) means forming beliefs about facts, values, and strategies. It is sometimes worth trying to isolate the factual beliefs in order to test them empirically. But … Continue reading

Posted in moral network mapping, philosophy, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

from I to we: an outline of a theory

Facebook28 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 28These are the main ideas that I’ve defended (or plan to develop) in my theoretical scholarship. They are organized from micro to macro and from ethics to politics. As always, I put this draft online to welcome … Continue reading

Posted in civic theory, deliberation, moral network mapping, philosophy | Leave a comment

what makes conversation go well (a network model)

Facebook1 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 1I’m looking forward to presenting later today at NULab’s first annual conference, on the theme: “Keeping the Public Sphere Open.” I think of the “public sphere” as all the venues where people come together to share experiences, emotions, … Continue reading

Posted in deliberation, moral network mapping | Leave a comment

structured moral pluralism (a proposal)

Facebook43 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 43(New York) Isaiah Berlin recalled that the Russian novelists he read as boy shared with “the major figures [of philosophy], especially in the field of ethical and political thought,” a common “Platonic ideal.” This ideal implied, In the first place … Continue reading

Posted in moral network mapping, philosophy | Leave a comment

an alternative to Moral Foundations Theory

Facebook23 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 23Jonathan Haidt’s Moral Foundations Theory is one of the most influential current approaches to moral psychology and it exemplifies certain assumptions that are pervasive in psychology more generally. I have been working lately with 18 friends and … Continue reading

Posted in moral network mapping, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

10 theses about ethics, in network terms

Facebook13 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 13 People hold many morally relevant opinions, some concrete and particular, some abstract and general, some tentative and others categorical. People see connections–usually logical or empirical relationships–between some pairs of their own opinions and can link all of their … Continue reading

Posted in moral network mapping, philosophy, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

the advantages and drawbacks of precision in ethics

Facebook7 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 7I like to ask people to state their own beliefs that are relevant to ethics and then draw connections among those ideas to create networks that represent their moral worldviews. I put people (students and others) in … Continue reading

Posted in moral network mapping, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Selim Berker on moral coherence

Facebook21 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 21In “Coherentism via Graphs,”[i] Selim Berker begins to work out a theory of the coherence of a person’s beliefs in terms of its network properties. Consider these two diagrams (A and B) borrowed from his article, both … Continue reading

Posted in moral network mapping, philosophy | Leave a comment

network dynamics in conversation

Facebook17 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 17(Dayton, OH) It is in conversations–face-to-face or virtual, oral or written, small or massive, formal or informal–that we form our views of public issues, hold ourselves accountable for our reasons and actions, check our assumptions, expand our … Continue reading

Posted in moral network mapping, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

on philosophy as a way of life

Facebook12 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 12(San Antonio, TX) Here I briefly introduce schools of thought–Indian and European–that have combined introspective mental exercises with reasoning about moral principles and critical analysis of social systems. I contrast their integrated approach to forms of philosophy … Continue reading

Posted in moral network mapping, philosophy | 3 Comments