Monthly Archives: April 2014

where is the public on Common Core?

Facebook6 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 6(Durham, NC) The Common Core standards are the most significant policy change in US education today, and they are increasingly controversial. Strong critics can be found on both the right and left. Meanwhile, the most influential proponents … Continue reading

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a day of two provosts

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0Today is the board meeting of the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts, where I work. Immediately after that meeting, I will fly to Durham, NC, to begin chairing the external review … Continue reading

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discrimination and educational ambition

Facebook6 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 6I thought this was a crucial moment in the recent debate between Jonathan Chait and Ta-Nehesi Coats: Chait: The argument is that structural conditions shape culture, and culture, in turn, can take on a life of its … Continue reading

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is society an artifact or an ecosystem? (and what that means for citizens)

Facebook19 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 19A fundamental question for anyone who wants to improve the world is which aspects of society are (1) natural and fixed, (2) artifacts that we make, or (3) elements of an ecosystem or social fabric that holds … Continue reading

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class disparities in extracurricular activities

Facebook14 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 14From the CIRCLE homepage today: Young people in the United States are starkly divided in how they use their leisure time. Some exclusively pursue their artistic or athletic passions and eschew other types of activities. Others spend … Continue reading

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an empirical study of the humanities

Facebook9 Twitter1 Google+0Total: 10The strongest arguments for the humanities are not about their effects. In order to decide whether any given outcome or impact is desirable, we must have a considered opinion of what is good. The humanities are the … Continue reading

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the political advantages of organized religion

Facebook9 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 9A piece of mine entitled “If Millennials Leave Religion, then What?” was published by the Religion News Service and picked up by the Washington Post yesterday. In it, I acknowledge the drawbacks of religion (viewed from a … Continue reading

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the Midwestern public universities

Facebook45 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 45(Madison, WI) I am here very briefly for a meeting, having come from this morning from Urbana/Champaign. My calendar for this six month period also shows days in Ann Arbor, Indianapolis, Bloomington, Chicago, and Detroit. I don’t … Continue reading

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Review of We Are the Ones

Facebook17 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 17(Urbana/Champaign, IL) I am here to talk to a public audience about the arguments of We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For: The Promise of Civic Renewal in America. Meanwhile, I’d recommend Michael McQuarrie’s new review of … Continue reading

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talking about We Are The Ones We Have Been Waiting For on WFPW

Facebook3 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 3Here is the audio of David Whetstone and me talking this morning on WPFW’s “Community Watch & Comment” show in Washington, DC. The topic was my book, We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For. The … Continue reading

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