Monthly Archives: June 2013

the model of We are the Ones …

Facebook6 Twitter0Total6My new book, We are the Ones We Have been Waiting For (which you can get from Amazon on October 8), essentially presents the following model: In part, this model is empirical. The arrows are causal, so they depend … Continue reading

Posted in civic theory | Leave a comment

educating the public when people don’t trust each other

Facebook9 Twitter0Total9(This is the fifth in a series of blog posts by CIRCLE, which evaluated several initiatives funded by the Democracy Fund to inform and engage voters during the 2012 election. These posts discuss issues of general interest that emerged … Continue reading

Posted in 2012 election | Leave a comment

civic studies at Frontiers of Democracy 2013

Facebook8 Twitter0Total8Former members of the Summer Institute of Civic Studies and their colleagues have put together a track of discussions for this summer’s Frontiers of Democracy Conference. They have designed an exciting mix of theory, practice, and applications to particular … Continue reading

Posted in civic theory | Leave a comment

Albert O. Hirschman on exit, voice, and loyalty

Facebook13 Twitter0Total14Jeremy Adelman’s recent biography of the recently deceased Albert Hirschman has prompted good writing: see Malcolm Gladwell in The New Yorker, Cass Sunstein in the New York Review, and a nice discussion at the Reality-Based Community. For me, Hirschman’s … Continue reading

Posted in civic theory, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

tell it straight? the advantages and dangers of parody

Facebook4 Twitter0Total4This is the fourth in a series of blog posts by CIRCLE, which evaluated several initiatives funded by the Democracy Fund to inform and engage voters during the 2012 election. Our posts discuss issues of general interest that emerged … Continue reading

Posted in 2012 election | Leave a comment

activist forms of civic education are traditional

Facebook15 Twitter0Total15(Washington, DC) One of my refrains is that we have not recently invented the idea that students can learn to be citizens by practicing citizenship. That is a traditional concept, rooted in Aristotle, de Tocqueville, Mill, and other theorists, … Continue reading

Posted in advocating civic education | Leave a comment

how to reach a large scale with high-quality messages

Facebook4 Twitter0Total4(Washington, DC) This post–cross-posted on the Democracy Fund blog—is the third in a series about CIRCLE’s  evaluations of the Fund’s initiatives to inform and engage voters during the 2012 election. These posts discuss issues of general interest that emerged … Continue reading

Posted in deliberation, press criticism | Leave a comment

young people and government data surveillance

Facebook4 Twitter0Total4Sixty percent of young Americans support Edward Snowden’s leaks of the NSA data surveillance program, versus 36% of people age 65 and older. CNN’s latest poll finds that just 45% of young people now approve of the president’s performance, down … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

supporting a beleaguered news industry

Facebook0 Twitter0Total0This is the second in a series of blog posts about CIRCLE’s evaluations of initiatives funded by the Democracy Fund to inform and engage voters during the 2012 election. It is cross-posted from the Democracy Fund blog. Two Democracy Fund … Continue reading

Posted in press criticism, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

why so few new colleges?

Facebook1 Twitter0Total1Americans found colleges and universities. That tradition started in 1636 and it explains why we have nearly 4,500 degree-granting institutions today. Typically, periods of population growth and migration are marked by the founding of lots of new colleges and … Continue reading

Posted in academia | Leave a comment