Monthly Archives: March 2011

upcoming research discussions at Tisch College

These three events are open to the public. 1. Discussion with 2011 Tisch Research Prize winner John Gaventa 2. “Determinants of Health Among Caribbean Latinos” with Flavia Peréa and Linda Sprague Martinez 3. “Development of Korean Civil Society” with Prof. … Continue reading

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recent fiction by Karen Russell, Jed Rubenfeld, Harry Dolan

Bad Things Happen by Harry Dolan is a neatly constructed mystery with elements of noir, police procedural, and a drawing-room detective story. The author, a very clever guy with a philosophy degree, plays with some interesting ideas as he introduces … Continue reading

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Arne Duncan on civic education policy

(Washington, DC) At a conference here on Educating for Democracy in a Digital Age, the Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, said, “A foundation in civics education is not a luxury but a necessity. … Civics cannot be pushed to the … Continue reading

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when finally I lie

The boy watches fluid in tubes, lab coats, Hurried sneakers, hushed exchanges, and thinks He could grow into one who consults notes, Gives opinions, adjusts that thing that blinks Beneath the window that reveals the wall Of the mall, where … Continue reading

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assessment: an overview

Recently I presented some thoughts about why and how we might use assessment in civic education. Most of my points apply to education in general. People seemed to find these ideas useful, so I offer my notes here. Assessment for … Continue reading

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Congress considers honoring Christina Taylor-Green by supporting civil discussion in schools

House resolution 181 proposes to honor “the memory of Christina-Taylor Green by encouraging schools to teach civic education and civil discourse in public schools.” I love the bill for three reasons: First, the very best way to honor the life … Continue reading

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constitutional piety

Montpelier, VA: I am staying at an almost-literal shrine to the United States Constitution, James Madison’s own house, where they (rightly) preserve an ink stain on the floor that may be some of the ink with which Mr. Madison took … Continue reading

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at Montpelier

Montpelier, VA–I am getting ready to sleep on the property of Montpelier, James Madison’s house. His Georgian/Federalist mansion is at the top of the nearby hill, overlooking horse fields and the Blue Ridge Mountains. Past his Greek temple “folly” and … Continue reading

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Robert Lowell at the Indian Killer’s Grave

King Philip’s War was a struggle between the New England Puritan settlers and Native Americans. Fought in 1675-6, it caused the deaths of about 800 colonists and 3,000 Native Americans and a catastrophe for the Native peoples of New England. … Continue reading

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the West and the rest

It seems impossible to distinguish between the West and other civilizations or regions of the globe, because anything we might call “the West” is so internally diverse and vaguely bordered. It’s easy to make up a list of famous Western … Continue reading

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