Monthly Archives: August 2007

national service

Time Magazine’s editor, Rick Stengel, makes the case for a large-scale but voluntary national service program in an editorial that accompanies a whole cover issue on service and volunteering. It’s a useful contribution because: It’s a concrete policy recommendation that … Continue reading

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good news about NCLB

Rep. George Miller, who leads the House Democrats on education policy and strongly backed No Child Left Behind, has issued draft language regarding reform of that Act. It says, in part: Title I, Part I, includes a new program to … Continue reading

Posted in advocating civic education | Leave a comment

hypocrisy

If Senator Larry Craig opposed gay rights and said hostile things about gays while occasionally soliciting gay sex, he was hypocritical. Hypocrisy is one of the easiest faults to prove, but it is not one of the worst faults, especially … Continue reading

Posted in philosophy | 5 Comments

Baltimore

(On the MARC commuter train) I just spent the day in Baltimore, first with a community-based youth group (Students Sharing Coalition), and then at a public high school, City College High. Baltimore is the next city up the east coast … Continue reading

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portrait of a library

Last April, I posted a poem that Stephen Dunn wrote about the home in which I was raised–a home most remarkable for the 30,000 books that my Dad has collected and used for his scholarship. People liked the post, presumably … Continue reading

Posted in memoir | 3 Comments

vacation

We’ll be in Upstate New York until August 24th, and I’m going offline to rest and recharge. No posts here until the 27th. Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook share via Reddit Share with Stumblers Tweet about … Continue reading

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the British shift to participation

While on our side of the Atlantic we struggle to promote themes of public participation (see the November Fifth Coalition for some ideas), in Britain, the new Government has fully embraced civic engagement. As Polly Toynbee writes in the Guardian: … Continue reading

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Susanna Clarke’s industrial revolution

I think this is a fairly obvious point, but I can’t find it elaborated anywhere in the web: It seems to me that Susanna Clarke’s very entertaining novel Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell is an allegory of the Industrial Revolution. … Continue reading

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service interruption

This is our cable box, outside our bedroom window. It was flattened by a large truck while I was on a conference call a few minutes ago. Our high-speed Internet access goes through there. I’m now online though my cell … Continue reading

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principles of a discipline of citizenship

I’ve written before about the lack of an academic discipline relevant to civics or citizenship. If there were such a discipline, it might adopt the following principles: The ultimate purpose of studying politics is to decide what should be done. … Continue reading

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