Monthly Archives: January 2004

the legality of invading Iraq

I am open to the possibility that the US invasion of Iraq will ultimately turn out to be a noble and successful battle against tyranny. Thus I am not eager to complain that the war was illegal. But the relevant … Continue reading

Posted in The Middle East | 1 Comment

cyberbalkanization

There’s a lively discussion of “cyberbalkanization” on the Deliberative Democracy Consortium’s blog. The discussion was prompted by a New York Times article last Sunday that claimed that people use the Internet to sort themselves into small, homogeneous groups and to … Continue reading

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jury duty

I was in the pool for jury duty today, although I was not selected for a panel. (This happens like clockwork every two years.) I used to want to be selected, because I study deliberation, and a jury is the … Continue reading

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online organizations

I’ve been asked to write an article on how young political activists use the Internet. After an introduction about the political potential of the “commons,” I turn to various types of online youth activity. One short section concerns online political … Continue reading

Posted in Internet and public issues | 1 Comment

explaining politics to the very young

We’ve got kids (one 4 and one 14), and sometimes it’s hard to explain the primary campaign to them. I’ve come up with the following key, which may come in handy for others who face the same predicament: John Kerry … Continue reading

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federal leverage over education

I attended a forum today on No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the major federal education law. The event took place in a U.S. House office building on Capitol Hill; it was organized by the American Youth Policy Forum. I have … Continue reading

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Cole Campbell in Press Think

I’m with Cole Campbell at a Kettering Foundation event in Ohio. Cole is the former editor of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and a consistently interesting thinker about the media. It so happens that he is also the current “guest blogger” … Continue reading

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Iowa thoughts

(Written in Oxford, OH): There is already too much post-Iowa punditry, but here are two points I would stress: The two candidates who were endorsed by labor unions each got about 20 percent of union household votes. Unions were thus … Continue reading

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young voters in Iowa

We’re working on a press release to report that young people (ages 18-29) quadrupled their turnout in the Iowa Caucuses, compared to 2000. They voted at considerably higher rates than the 30-44 age group and represened almost as big a … Continue reading

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What stories are worth reporting

Christopher Dickey, who covers Iraq for Newsweek, has decided against carrying a gun when he’s in Baghdad. He doesn’t think it would make him any safer. But he recognizes that reporters are in danger there; 19 have died so far. … Continue reading

Posted in press criticism, The Middle East | 2 Comments