Monthly Archives: April 2003

medical information on federal websites

My blog is listed as "exemplary" on the blog of Dr. John Gøtze, a Danish guy. At the risk of appearing to logroll, I would heartily endorse "Gotzeblogged" (as he calls his blog) for providing relatively technical (yet accessible) information … Continue reading

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Cesar Chavez school

I spoke today at the Cesar Chavez Public Charter School for Public Policy, which is a wonderful school that I have visited before. It’s a crowded warren of rooms on an upstairs floor of a former industrial building, where kids … Continue reading

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the point of civics

I was interviewed over the weekend by a group called Civic Honors. The interview is posted here. It was an opportunity to say why I personally believe in civic engagement. I said: My philosophical position would be something like this: … Continue reading

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our kids’ product

Our high school students’ online history project tells the epic history of their own schools’ desegregation, from 1955-2000. It includes an introductory slide show, a timeline and graph of the county’s massive demographic changes, a set of oral history interviews, … Continue reading

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kids in urban planning

I wrote part of a grant proposal today that would allow our high school students to conduct research connected to nutrition, exercise, and obesity. They would identify local opportunities for recreational exercise and healthy food, and also local sources of … Continue reading

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deliberation and philosophy

I have been thinking a little about the contrast between public deliberation and the professional discipline of philosophy. Philosophers like to make and explore novel distinctions. In part, this is because they pursue truth, and an ambiguity or equivocation is … Continue reading

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talking about the commons at Berkeley

I’m off to California, so this blog may have to pause until April 23. I’m going to Berkeley to give a talk at the Center for the Study of Law and Society (co-sponsored by the Berkeley Center for Law and … Continue reading

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a new threat to open access

Here’s a troubling technological development, pointed out by Jeff Chester of the Center for Digital Democracy. A company called Ellacoya provides "network traffic control" software and hardware that allows Internet Service Providers (ISP) to track their own customers closely and … Continue reading

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attacking a politician for his mixed feelings

Larry Sabato’s "Crystal Ball" is often a good indication of what the hard-boiled political analysts think. Sabato writes about Sen. John Kerry and the war. "It’s also possible that John Kerry will reap the benefits of being Clintonian, of voting … Continue reading

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the commons & common carriers

Some people regard the telephone network as a "commons," because the telephone companies have been regulated as "common carriers" by the FCC. Today, the Commission simply defines "common carrier" as "the term used to describe a telephone company." But the … Continue reading

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