Monthly Archives: January 2003

a textbook idea

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0I’ve been writing my proposal for an innovative high school civics textbook. I’m tentatively calling it Civics for Citizens. Unlike any competing text, it will combine challenging academic content with exercises and materials designed to help students … Continue reading

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the public interest media groups

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0I agreed today to serve on the dissertation committee of a graduate student who wants to study the political strategy of the "progressive" public-interest groups that lobby for changes in federal communications policy. These groups (the so-called … Continue reading

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an oral history interview

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0Our high school students interviewed a woman today who was one of only two African Americans at an all-White junior high school in 1956, and then the only one when her friend quit. She later chose to … Continue reading

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the State of the Union

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0I’m less reflexively anti-Bush than many of my friends and family members, and I didn’t hate the State of the Union. But the "compassionate" parts are disturbing—as a reflection of our political culture, if not of George … Continue reading

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we need new civics texts

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0I’m working ineffectively on lots of separate projects, including trying to fix the NACE Website so that it works for older Web browsers. In between things, I’ve been writing a proposal for a new kind of high … Continue reading

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state voter guides

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0I spent the morning discussing policies of the National Alliance for Civic Education. The meeting was at the American Political Science Association (APSA) headquarters near Dupont Circle in Washington. I love the building, which is an elegant, … Continue reading

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paid public service (etc.)

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0My first stop today was a meeting with people who counsel Maryland’s applicants for national scholarships, such as the Rhodes and Marshall. I advise our Rhodes applicants, partly because I want to level the playing field between … Continue reading

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the value of studying history

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0As usual, the most interesting part of my day is working with the class of students at Northwestern High School. They interviewed a White teacher who had taught in the County schools from 1968 to the present, … Continue reading

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standardizing medicine

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0A bad day for blogging, because I’m very busy with the technical details of preparing our joint report with the Carnegie Corporation, the Civic Mission of Schools. Choosing paper stock is not interesting to write about. I … Continue reading

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with Volokh, Reynolds, and Balkin

Facebook0 Twitter0 Google+0Total: 0A little more than two weeks ago, I moderated a panel at the Association of American Law Schools Conference. Two of the panelists were famous bloggers (so I’ll use their full names): Glenn Reynolds and Eugene Volokh. … Continue reading

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